Can I be Cremated if I’ve had Hip or Knee Replacement?

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“Can I be cremated if I’ve had hip or knee replacement?” is a reasonable question and the answer is yes! Increasing people are choosing cremation as their choice of disposition. According to the Board of Funeral Services Ontario Quick Facts 2103, of the 93,102 registered deaths in 2013, 56,294 or 60.46% of the disposition was cremation. These figures are provided by the Office of the Registrar General and data from 2014 is not available.

The process of cremation takes 3 – 4 hours and reduces the body to bone fragments. The materials used in a joint replacement will be part of the cremated remains. When the cremated remains are cool, the crematorium technician will pass a magnet over the cremated remains and remove the metal debris. The technician will also visually inspect the cremated remains and remove the hardware associated with the joint replacement.

After cremation is complete, the bone residue of the skull, head of the femur and humerus, and the teeth may be processed into a finer granular form and combined with the remainder of the cremated remains.

The cremated remains are returned to the funeral home in a plastic temporary container that is about the size of a large tissue box ( 9 cm x15cm x 23cm) and weighs around 4- 5 kg. I have seen cases where the deceased likely had very dense bones as the cremated remains were returned in 2 boxes. It is important to know the size of the cremated remains if you wish to place the cremated remains into an urn and then into a niche which is usually about a cubic 30cm.

Two items that must be removed prior to cremation are a pacemaker or radioactive implants. This is done by a Class 1 Funeral Director. If this is your scenario please be sure to inform the Funeral Director.

If cremation is the choice of disposition it is still possible to have visiting, a service and a reception.

As cremation becomes an increasingly popular choice of disposition, one thing I encourage people to think through and talk about is; What would you like your personal representative or Estate Trustee to do with your cremated remains? Final disposition of cremated remains can vary. They may be buried or scattered:

  • On your personal property
  • On Crown land
  • At a cemetery.

Cremated remains can also be kept in one’s personal possession or a combination of the above choices.

Do you have questions about cremation or about pre-funeral planning in general? I welcome your feedback and questions. You can connect with me via email or telephone, leave a comment here on the site or click the contact tab at the bottom of the screen if you are reading this post on the website. Don’t forget to join in the conversation on Facebook and Twitter too!

Until next time

Kat

Katherine Downey is the #1 Funeral Preplanning Professional in Canada for the fourth time. She is a professional educator, author, radio host, licensed funeral director and insurance advisor. To set an appointment or have your questions answered, please contact Kat directly.

Disabled Beneficiaries – Would a Henson Trust Benefit your Situation?

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Many Canadians are aware of the importance of having a valid will and powers of attorney document, yet, the importance of these documents is vastly underestimated in the special needs arena. Careful estate planning is necessary if persons with disabilities are to become beneficiaries of an estate. Individuals who live in Ontario should consider taking advantage of the Henson Trust when planning for their beneficiaries, who are recipients of ODSP benefits. Continue reading

What to do Next When a Loved One Dies in Hospital

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I have had this question from a few people who have attended my seminars… “If my loved one dies in the hospital – what do I do next?”  The answer is – Your first call is to the Funeral Home.

The Funeral Home will ask you some initial questions and fill out what is called a First Call Sheet. The information needed will be: Continue reading

What is a Coroner’s Certificate? 4 Situations Where it’s Required

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Many clients have asked me what a Coroner’s Certificate is and why they need it. Here are 4 situations where it is required.

1. Cremation application

Under the authority of the Coroners Act R.S.O. 1990 C.C. 37 a Coroner will investigate the death of all people who wish to be cremated. The Coroner’s signature is required on all Cremation applications. This is necessary as the Coroner has the highest authority in the province and must sign a cremation application to authorize the cremation of the deceased. The Coroner is literally signing off that the deceased did not die of a suspicious or unusual circumstance that would require further investigation. Continue reading

How Much Does Burial Cost? 3 Items to Consider

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“I have been considering funeral options and have been wondering how much a burial will cost?” is a question I hear a lot. I think when people ask this question, they already have a number in their mind. And while they don’t usually share this number with me when we begin to discuss the type of funeral they want, they are often surprised and pleased that the total value is less than the figure they had in mind. Here are 3 costs to take into consideration in a full burial service. Continue reading

Cremation – What is the cost of a Funeral Anyway?

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What is the cost of a funeral anyway? is a question I am often asked. The answer is that it depends on the type of funeral or celebration of life you wish to setup and prepay. For example, there is a growing trend to select cremation as the choice of disposition, so I will discuss this option in this blog post. The cost of cremation depends on the crematorium that the funeral home uses and can range from approximately $450.00 to $650.00 or more. Additionally with cremation there are 2 mandatory disbursements: Continue reading

D E A D is a Four Letter Word

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Does just reading the word’ dead’ make you cringle? You are not alone. Many people know on an intellectual level that preplanning a funeral makes a lot of sense. Yet, taking action is often difficult. Dead is a four letter word. Consider this as an acronym for Dead:

D Dare

E Educate

A Action

D Done Continue reading

Who has Legal Authority to Deal with your Cremated Remains?

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Many people know that they wish to be cremated, however when I ask them what they would like their family to do with their cremated remains, I am often met with a blank look. People will say “well, I don’t care I will be dead.” While this is true, I don’t think these people realize the potential they are creating for family feuding. Yes families do argue, disagree, fight and litigate over who has the right to and what to do with mom or dad’s cremated remains. So who has the legal authority to deal with your cremated remains? Continue reading

Living Organ Donation – Let’s Talk

organ and tissue donation OntarioMany people are familiar with deceased organ and tissues donation, however it is possible to also consider healthy living organ donation. Living organ donation could include a kidney, part of the liver, lung, small bowel, or pancreas. The focus of this blog is live kidney donation.

Unfortunately the need for transplanted organs – live or deceased is far greater than the supply. Many people on the kidney wait-list will die before they receive a compatible kidney. Continue reading

Estate Planning – Where Do I Put My Money?

funeral preplanning expert MississaugaBen Franklin said “In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” This statement was made centuries ago and still rings true today. When you think about your estate, do you struggle with where to put your money? Are you getting a tax refund this year? Have you maxed out your RSP and TFSA? Yes? If this is your fortunate financial situation, well done and good for you! What’s next? Continue reading