why you need a legal will
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8 Reasons Why You Need a Legal Will

Who needs a legal Will? Every adult of mental capacity over the age of 18 years!

But, I Don’t Have Any Assets

Many people say that they do not have any assets therefore they do not need a legal will.  This is not true.  You may have few assets, yet you still need someone to be your legal voice for you when you die.

The main objective of a will is to name a person to be your Estate Trustee, to act on your behalf and to close off your estate when you die.

If you were to witness the family dysfunction, additional costs and emotional and physical turmoil that people go through when there is not a Will in place, I think you would seriously reconsider your rational to not have a valid Will.

Is Drafting a Legal Will Expensive?

Drafting a will does not have to be expensive.  There are no–cost and low-cost ways to draft a valid will.

Having a valid will in place shows that you care for your family, friends, pets and favorite charities.

Having a Valid Will Allows For:

  1. You to decide who will look after your minor children
  2. You to decide who will look after your pets
  3. Deciding who gets your assets
  4. Faster and easier settlement of your Estate
  5. Transfer of your estate in a tax effective manner
  6. Lower administration cost of your Estate
  7. Less taxes paid to the Provincial and Federal Government
  8. You to leave a bequest to your favorite charity

In short, having a valid Will in place protects the people you care about.

If you are not sure how to start or what makes a Will valid, all you have to do is connect with me and let’s chat.

It truly is that easy.

Remember where there is a Will there is a way to leave a loving legacy – because Your Legacy Matters.

I would love to hear from you and help get the conversation started.  You can connect with me via email or telephone, leave a comment here on the site or click the contact tab at the bottom of the screen if you are reading this post on the website. Don’t forget to join in the conversation on Facebook and Twitter too.

Until next time,

Kat

Katherine Downey is the #1 Funeral Preplanning Professional in Canada for the fourth time. She is a professional educator, author, licensed funeral director and insurance advisor. Not only is she a Certified Professional Consultant on Ageing and an Executive Advisor, but she is compassionately understanding.  To set an appointment or have your questions answered, please contact Kat directly

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What is the difference between a funeral service and a memorial service Part 2

There are several ways to celebrate the life of a deceased loved one.

In part 1 of this blog I mentioned that a funeral service means that the body of the deceased is present at the service.  Now I will go over the details of a memorial service and the primary difference between a funeral service and a memorial service.

A memorial service means that the body of the deceased is not present at the celebration of life.  The deceased may have been buried or cremated prior to the memorial service.  Or in other more tragic circumstances, the body of the deceased may not be available to hold a funeral service and the family elects to have a memorial service instead.

Visiting is very common with a memorial service.  Visiting could be a day or two before or a few hours prior to the memorial service on the same day.  Visiting is not obligatory, yet many families value this time to have the support of their family and friends.

A family could hold a memorial service in addition to or in place of a funeral service.  For instance, the family may elect to hold a funeral service in the town where the deceased lived and died. Then hold a memorial service at a later date in the town where the person was born.

Whether you prefer a funeral or a memorial service, the important piece is to think through how you would like your life to be celebrated.

Take a quiet moment and ponder what this looks like for you.  Then take massive action.  Set up your plans and prefund them at the funeral home of your choice.  Finally, let your family know you have done this, especially your Estate Trustee.  Do not include your funeral or memorial services in your will, as the will is typically read after the celebration of life.

One family comes to mind that experienced this unfortunate issue.  When their father died they had no idea how he wanted his life celebrated.  They discussed this and elected to have him cremated and then held a memorial service.  Later when they read his will, they found out he had wanted to be buried – oops!  Unfortunately cremation is irreversible and this family had to live with their decision.

Don’t put your family is this position.  Take charge of your celebration of life and set it up the way you want now.

If you are unsure where/how to start, then I invite you to connect with me.  I work with my clients to make this process easier and to avoid any headaches during an already emotional time after the deceased has passed.  To help start the discussion, I offer a free consultation to see the available options and how to get started preplanning.

I would love to hear from you.  You can connect with me via email or telephone, leave a comment here on the site or click the contact tab at the bottom of the screen if you are reading this post on the website. Don’t forget to join in the conversation on Facebook and Twitter too!

Kat

Katherine Downey is the #1 Funeral Preplanning Professional in Canada for the fourth time. She is a professional educator, author, licensed funeral director and insurance advisor. To set an appointment or have your questions answered, please contact Kat directly.

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What Happens to One’s Social Media & Digital Footprint When They Die?

Last year a colleague died suddenly and tragically.  It was a tremendous shock to the community and people showed up in droves to pay their respects.  Last week a request to endorse this person popped up on LinkedIn and I was immediately thrown right back to last year.  This left me thinking about what is the best way to handle a deceased person’s presence on social media?  What will happen to their social media accounts and digital footprint in general? Read more

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Snowbird Traveler’s Check List – 15 Things to Consider

secure return travel assurance plan Are you a snowbird? How wonderful it is to be able to travel south to warmer weather over the winter. Before you fly or drive away, peruse the checklist of 15 items below to be sure you have your health and hearth protected. Read more

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Process for Assessing & Collecting Ontario Estate Administration Tax

Ontario Estate Administration Tax

In the 2011 Ontario budget, the Ontario government indicated that they would tighten the probate filing rules to enhance compliance by transferring administration of the Estate Administration Tax from the Ministry of the Attorney General to the Ministry of Revenue and Finance. This change received royal assent in 2011 and was announced in force January 1st, 2015. Effective January 1st, 2015, the Ministry of Finance now has a more defined process for assessing and collecting the Estate Administration Tax (EAT). Read more

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Ontario Estate Administration Tax Filing Rules

prepaid funeral plans Mississauga Oakville

In our last blog we spoke about Ontario Probate becoming the Estate Administration Tax, the Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee and the importance of this certificate to confirm the appointment of an Estate Trustee. This certificate authorizes the Estate Trustee to work on behalf of the deceased and start the process of closing the estate. Further to this, effective January 1, 2015, the Ontario Ministry of Finance implemented new Estate Filing Rules for people acting as an Estate Trustee in Ontario, for estates valued at greater than $1,000.00. Read more

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Ontario Probate Fees Become the Estate Administration Tax

Ontario Estate Administration Tax

Did you know that in Ontario, probate fees on an estate have been replaced with something called the Estate Administration Tax?  In this multi-part series on the new Estate Administration Tax, I will share information that you and your estate representative will need to know.  This blog post focuses on what are considered the deceased’s assets and the Estate Administration Tax (EAT) payable on these assets. Read more